TfL from 18th May are improving bus links for customers affected by Hammersmith Bridge Closure

Small consolation for those customers affected by Hammersmith Bridge closure, TFL are improving bus links whilst the bridge remains closed.

 

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Hammersmith Bridge - A Labour Fiasco

Residents on both sides of the bridge have been let down by both Sadiq Khan and Labour controlled H&F with neither of them taking responsibility and both being evasive about the sudden closure of the bridge.

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Introducing our new Hammersmith Parliamentary Candidate

Our new Hammersmith parliamentary candidate, Irina von Wiese, shares her story and explains why Liberal Democrat values are so important to her.

 

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Post Conference Report

Dear friends,

This past weekend I attended our Liberal Democrat conference in York where we voted to create a “registered supporter” scheme. This scheme is for those who do not wish to or can’t join a political party but who share our liberal values with regards to Brexit and want to help from time to time. Yesterday our leader Vince Cable delivered a brilliant speech which outlined all the values that are passionately close to me.

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Staggering tax rises in H&F

Today I received my council tax bill accompanied with a 20-page glossy brochure. The H&F council controlled element of my bill has increased by a staggering 4.7%, a rise of more than 100% above inflation.
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Annual General Meeting

It is that time of the year again: Hammersmith and Fulham is having its Annual General Meeting. It will take place on Wednesday 28th November at 7:30 in the Ballroom, Linden House, Upper Mall, Hammersmith, London W6 9TA. This venue is fully accessible. The AGM will be followed by drinks at The Old Ship, 25 Upper Mall, Hammersmith, London W6 9TD.

For details about the meeting and how to apply, please write to florian@hflibdems.org.uk.


The Price of Being British

Becoming French, German, Italian or Spanish costs, on average, £156. As of April 2018, becoming British costs £1330, plus £65 for the prerequisite Permanent Residence document and about £200 for tests fees, authentications, language skill certifications and document translations. And then, if after many months your application is finally approved and the finishing line is in sight, you are likely to be asked to pay another £130 for the citizenship ceremony (unless you can afford to take a day off work to attend the free weekday morning ceremony)[1]. This does not, of course, include the hours invested in filling in forms, memorising test questions and waiting in various queues for document services, biometric enrolment and test administration.

 

I am not lamenting the gaping hole in my wallet. Having lived and worked in the UK for 22 years, I am fortunate to have a good income and will not suffer significant hardship as a result of becoming British. Not everyone is as fortunate. More importantly, not everyone should have to be in order to be eligible for Britishness. This is important because it goes to the heart of what this government seeks to construct: a society ruled by those who can pay, and a ‘hostile environment’ for those who can’t. A de-facto tax on voting.

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Azi Ahmed on Heathrow & Greg Hands' resignation

Some would say Greg Hands' protest against Brexit and Heathrow’s third runway was a ploy to win the next election, but I see it differently.

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H&F LibDems call on MPs to vote against Government's Heathrow expansion plans

Today members of Parliament will vote on wether to expand Heathrow airport. The Liberal Democrats are the only party to have consistently opposed this expansion including blocking plans put forward by the Labour government as early as 2006 and the Conservatives in 2010.

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Amplify Your Voice

EU citizens in the UK may only have one more chance to influence decisions in their country of residence.

Tomorrow’s elections are more than just a vote on local issues. They are the voice of those who did not have a chance to vote in the EU referendum and the general elections, those who did not get a say on Brexit, on the treatment of immigrants by the Home Office, on negotiations with the EU or third countries – in other words, those most directly and harshly affected by political decisions in the UK.

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